Trimming

A Different Point Of View

Wisconsin farrier experiments with video to learn more about equine gaits
Thanks to advancing technology, it’s never been easier or more efficient for farriers to utilize video in their hoof-care practice. According to the exclusive 2016 Farrier Business Practices Survey conducted by American Farriers Journal, 54% of farriers use a smartphone to record video in their practice, a 3% increase from the 2014 study.
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Q&A: May/June 2017

What discipline do you find challenges you the most when the horse interferes and why?

A: Shoeing Standardbred racehorses that interfere can be the most challenging. The fact that they are moving at the fastest speeds increases the likelihood that any conformational anomalies will result in limb interference, so balancing feet with proper trim and shoes of proper weight is a must.


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Farriers Sweat The Small Stuff To Keep Performance Horses Competing

Sore feet, abscesses occur regardless of discipline and require quick and effective hoof care
Performance horses, by the very nature of the work they are asked to do, are more prone to injuries than horses that are being used primarily for recreational riding. There are a number of studies that offer evidence that certain injuries are more likely to occur with certain disciplines, but an informal survey of several experienced farriers indicates that across disciplines, more common injuries such as sore feet and abscesses are the culprits that farriers most often have to deal with.
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What Do Horn Tubules Do?

Although farriers know that horn tubules play an important role in hoof wall structure, this article provides a deeper understanding of it
The equine hoof wall has a complex tubular structure, which extends across the stratum medium. In a healthy hoof, the tubules are straight, parallel to each other and descend at the same angle as the hoof capsule. On the bearing border surface of a trimmed hoof, they can be seen as a pattern of rings. Our human skin is an epidermal structure like the hoof, and yet skin does not have horn tubules within it. This article sets out to answer the simple question of why horn tubules exist within the hoof wall.
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