Safety & Healthcare

Research Journal

Researchers Study Separation Anxiety in Horses

A collaborative group of researchers from around the globe evaluated the efficacy of using reinforcement of an alternative behavior (specifically a clicker and edible snacks as a reward for touching a target with their nose) to reduce unwanted behaviors (aggression, agitation, stereotypy) attributed to anxiety caused by separation of horses from their peers or a bonded conspecific.
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The Way It Was

Education and Entertainment When Lighting a Forge

The never-ending push for farriers to improve efficiency in their practice
Sometime in the early ’80s, Scott Simpson was running the farrier education program at Walla Walla Community College. I knew him well from taking an individual studies class during the previous winter. I wanted to improve my forging skills and Scott let me sign up for the class, but, having had 8 years in the field at that time, I worked apart from the regular class at the anvil rather than under horses.
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Shoeing for a Living

Haul-In Farrier Practice Thrives in an Unlikely Place

Jake Stonefield’s practice provides a controlled work environment in rural South Dakota
Conventional wisdom suggests farriers must travel to their hoof-care clients if they want to stay in business. After all, what motivation do clients have to surrender the convenience of their shoer arriving at their barn to perform a valuable service?
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The Way It Was

The Carrot Trick

A horse learns about its farrier's tricks
There are stories that stick with us from our time working. We don’t even have to experience the tales ourselves, as simply hearing them returns us to the setting of the story.
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Therapeutic Shoeing

How to Achieve Benefits of the Onion Horseshoe

Farriers will need time, education and money when making and applying this device

Developed in France during the 17th century, the shoe was forged to protect the heel from corns or bruising. However, the French didn’t call them corns. Rather, they were called onions — hence the name of the shoe.


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