Anatomy

Getting To The Bottom Of Toe Cracks

Understanding what causes the problem is critical to correcting it

Toe cracks come in different forms, but none of them look good. Some cracks are small, others are long up the wall. Some are deep and others are superficial. All of us have heard, “Can you fix that crack?” Some can be corrected, but others will die with the horse. The biggest thing we must learn is what causes the crack in the first place. It’s just as important to know where it comes from as to where it’s going.


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Understanding And Managing Quarter Cracks

California farriers offer their advice to achieve positive outcomes

Tim Shannon has some succinct advice for farriers who deal with quarter cracks. “I’d suggest whoever wants to get into it to find somebody who knows a lot about [handling quarter cracks] to walk you through it,” advises the San Moreno, Calif., farrier. “There is a lot to crack repair.”


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Briefings May/June 2016

Lameness Occurs The Most Of All Equine Medical Problems

According to federal researchers, lameness has the highest annual incident density of all medical problems in horses, DVM360 Magazine reports. Half of all horse operations with five or more horses have one or more cases of lameness annually. Another federal report estimates lameness incidence at 7.5% to 13.7% annually.


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News & Notes

Robot-Driven Equine Imaging System Opens New Avenues For Discovery

Even those who have never had a CT scan are likely familiar with the process, which often entails a slow journey through a narrow tube. Given that the experience can elicit feelings of claustrophobia in human adults, it’s easy to imagine how complicated it can be to perform the same procedure on a 1,400-pound horse.
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Research Journal: April 2016

The information, ideas and opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the United States Department of Agriculture.
IV Tildren for Navicular Syndrome The efficacy of administering the injectable bisphosphonate medication for horses (Tildren) in two different ways was evaluated for the treatment of navicular syndrome. Twelve horses diagnosed with bilateral navicular syndrome were randomly assigned to receive Tildren either systemically by intravenous injection or by using regional limb perfusion, where the drug is “back-flushed” directly into the blood vessels of the lower limb so that it is delivered to the lower limb and hoof in a more direct, concentrated manner.
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Performance And Conformation

At higher levels of competition, understanding how a horse is put together becomes increasingly important
It’s natural for hoof-care professionals to focus primarily on a horse’s lower limbs as they work, but a general knowledge of equine anatomy and conformation is also important. This knowledge becomes more critical for those who work on performance horses. The higher the level of performance, the more critical that knowledge becomes.
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News & Notes

Equine Lameness: Subjective Versus Objective Assessment

Lameness is a common reason horses present to equine practitioners. Federal researchers note that lameness has the highest annual incident density of all medical problems in horses — half of all horse operations with five or more horses experience one or more cases of lameness annually. Another report estimates lameness incidence at 7.5% to 13.7% annually.
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