Trimming

Briefings

When it comes to addressing stabilization of the hoof and distal phalanx in laminitis cases, Pat Riley likes to take radiographs before and after every trimming and shoeing.


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Larry Stevens

Breaking Tradition

Changing your order in shoeing is often the key to safety with many young or problem horses

LIKE MANY FARRIERS, Larry Stevens spent years trimming and shoeing in the same sequence. He preferred starting with the left front foot, then the right front.


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It's No Big Feat!

Farrier says trimming pony feet with an electric grinder is not that difficult and offers multiple benefits
Trimming pony feet is one of the hardest things for me as a farrier. A pony’s stature and uncertain attitude makes the work difficult. We’re both in a very uncomfortable and awkward position. Trimming the off-front leg agitates most ponies and usually starts a fight.
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Physiological Trimming Theory Is Working

While some aspects of this scientifically proven trimming method are not new, they’ve been forgotten or under-utilized by many hoof-care professionals maintains this researcher
More than 10 years of intensive research at Michigan State University has resulted in new recommendations for relief from navicular syndrome and other chronic foot ailments.
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He's A "Sole Man"

California farrier Mike Savoldi challenges many traditional ideas on shoeing
Farrier/Researcher Michael Savoldi has a goal — a big goal. Savoldi is investigating the very core of how farriers trim and shoe feet.
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Farriers’ Roundtable

In our practice, we work with a number of veterinarians and service several “rescue” facilities. The entire team — owner, veterinarian and farrier — must carefully evaluate each case. 

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Mother Nature, Balance and Horseshoeing

This farrier maintains the shape of the foot and the angle of the pastern is predetermined and probably shouldn’t be changed
Part of the research on why horses are diagonal-footed animals indicated that it is impossible to have a capsule angle of 55 degrees and still maintain proper alignment of the interphalangeal axis.
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