Items Tagged with 'Doug Butler'

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Defining The Hoof Quarters

The prevalence of caudal foot problems leads Hall Of Fame farrier to spell out the critical, yet elusive, description
The front half of a horse’s hoof has been the center of trimming and shoeing discussions for quite some time. Specifically, finding the ideal breakover point has been the focus of countless conversations and endless training. Lafayette, Ind., farrier Danvers Child points out that the vast majority of hoof issues occur in the back half of the foot, not the front.
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What Causes Club Feet?

Hall Of Fame farrier Doug Butler examines why flexure limb deformities develop and how to prevent and manage them
The characteristics of a flexure limb deformity, commonly referred to as club foot, are easy to identify. Growth rings are wider at the heel, the toe is usually dished, the hoof is high on the heel and the coffin joint axis is broken forward. Radiographs often reveal that the coffin bone is deformed or remodeled. But what causes it?
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A Study System To Learn Equine Anatomy

Whether you need a deeper understanding or refresher of equine anatomy, these tips will help you retain this information critical to your work
In the first article of this series, I presented some simple strategies that are motivated by our desire to excel. As we learn new skills, we need to apply and implement them into our lives and businesses so that these become part of our everyday work.
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METALLURGY: How Much Do You Need To Know?

While not necessary to shoe horses, a working knowledge of how steel is made and reacts to heat and pressure can make a good career great
If you’re a horseshoer, you work with metal every day. But how much do you have to really know about metallurgy — the science underlying the working of metal — to be successful? That might depend on how you define success and what kind of farrier you want to be.
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Getting To The Bottom Of Toe Cracks

Understanding what causes the problem is critical to correcting it

Toe cracks come in different forms, but none of them look good. Some cracks are small, others are long up the wall. Some are deep and others are superficial. All of us have heard, “Can you fix that crack?” Some can be corrected, but others will die with the horse. The biggest thing we must learn is what causes the crack in the first place. It’s just as important to know where it comes from as to where it’s going.


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