Items Tagged with 'Deb Bennett'

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Equine Reciprocating Systems: Extreme Skeletal Specializations

In this sixth installment, Dr. Deb Bennett discusses the impact of the equine joint shape on the horse’s forelimb
Most, if not all, farriers are already familiar with the chain of bones that forms the equine forelimb: scapula, humerus, radius-ulna, carpal bones, cannon bones and splints, pastern bones and coffin bone. Added to this list are the three pseudo-bones called sesamoids, which lie behind the ankle and coffin joints.
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Equine Reciprocating Systems: Periosteum, Joints and Growth

In the fifth in this series, Dr. Deb Bennett illustrates how the horse matures and the role joints play in locomotion
The periosteum, thin but tough connective tissue that enwraps all true bones, was the focus of the third installment of this series, “Equine Reciprocating Systems: Connecting Tendon to Bone.” Knowledge of the periosteum creates a good starting point for learning the structure of joints.
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Equine Reciprocating Systems: Connecting Tendon to Bone

The third installment of this series examines bone formation and its relationship to the muscle tendon
The forelimb reciprocating apparatus of the horse is a unique and important biomechanical system that every farrier must understand before good decisions concerning hoof trim and appliances can be made. Detailed study of tissue types is the first step, but we also have to be careful of our choice of terminology.
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Understanding Ligaments and Tendons in Horses

In this first in a series, Dr. Deb Bennett discusses the scope of her anatomy lessons and misconceptions she finds with ligaments and tendons.
The specialized and fascinating anatomy and function of the reciprocating systems, which aid locomotion in horses, is crucially important for farriers. I want to begin by clearing up some confusions about anatomical terminology, as well as make clear my approach to teaching horse anatomy.
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Managing the Crooked Horse

Most equines are out of alignment one way or another — and a farrier can’t always fix it
Horses are very much like their owners in that they all tend to display some form of asymmetry, albeit in a wide and varied range. The most common causes of any lack of symmetrical proportion are continued habits of stance and movement.
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Leaning Horses, Revealing Hooves

Anatomy disposes horses to lean, a fact overlooked by most riders and farriers, but it could be the underlying cause of the hoof wear and growth patterns that shoers must deal with

If you start assessing a hoof only after picking it up, you might be missing important evidence that helps explain the condition of that foot, according to Deb Bennett. Instead, start the evaluation by watching the horse move and examining its standing posture. Watch for leaning, she says.


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International Hoof-Care Summit Continues Upward Climb

Attendees, Exhibitors and Presenters combine to make 4th annual event the best ever
With better hoof care on their minds and learning as their goal, almost 800 people gathered in Cincinnati, Ohio, from Jan. 30 to Feb. 2 for the 4th annual International Hoof-Care Summit. They didn't leave disappointed.
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