Disciplines & Breeds

Briefings

When American Farriers Journal readers provided data for the 2008 Farrier Business Practices Survey (see Pages 19 to 28), they were asked to estimate the percentage of horses living in their area that get different levels of hoof care. Here’s how the national averages worked out:


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Soaring
Soring

Disgraceful Practice Continues

Illegal or not, some still resort to this abusive and unethical method to enhance gaited horse animation and gain an edge in the show ring

The Horse Industry Organization (HIO) operating plan contract for the 14 certified groups states, “A pressure shoeing violation shall be defined as soring, trimming or engaging in any practice the result of which causes the inducement of pain in the sole of the foot.”


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Cover
Backyard Shoeing

Backbone of a Shoeing Career

Veteran shoers say backyard horses are a great way to get started in the business and can help round out your schedule when you move up to more specialized hoof-care work
Shoeing backyard horses is like many other things in life. Everybody does it, but few want to admit it.
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Feeding Pony
Nutrient Strategies

Dealing With Carbohydrates, Energy and Other Nutritional Mysteries

Given the opportunity and good health, the horses you work with will choose to consume enough feed to meet their energy needs
If forages provide the “maintenance” energy that horses need for the workings of everyday life — grazing, sleeping, wandering from pasture to pasture, maintaining internal temperature — then cereal grains like oats, corn and barley are the turbo-charged portion of the diet.
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Jumping Horse

Building A High-End Hunter-Jumper Practice

Honing skill, learning “farriery vocabulary” helped Mike Givney establish himself in a lucrative field
When Mike Givney talks about how he built his Otter Creek Farrier Service of Johnsonville, N.Y., into a successful hunter and jumper shoeing operation, he repeatedly refers to the underlying principles that have become the mainstays of his business: having options and paying attention to details.
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Briefings

Due to the constant pounding in training and racing, Susan Stover says, many Thoroughbreds end up with microscopic bone damage as the injured horse swaps damaged tissue for new tissue. However, the University of California veterinary researcher at Davis, Calif., found that more than 90 percent of tissue sampled from racehorses that had died or were euthanized after leg fractures had pre-existing bone damage.


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