When glue-on shoes became a regular part of his shoeing business, it didn’t take Red Renchin long to decide they needed a home of their own.

“To use them right, you need a lot of certain types of equipment,” says the International Horseshoeing Hall Of Fame member from Mequon, Wis. “I’d find myself running back to the truck for a heat gun or a new tube of glue. I wanted something where I could keep everything I need.” The result was Renchin’s glue-on cart.

It isn’t exactly a high-tech development. It’s a simple, 4-drawer aluminum cart, mounted on wheels that Renchin had built by Stone Well Bodies & Equipment of Genoa, N.Y. Renchin and his shoeing crews can roll it out of a shoeing rig and right up to the place where they’ll be gluing shoes onto a horse. Everything they need for the job will be right at hand. Each of the four drawers holds what’s needed for one part of the job.

Top Drawer: Prep. This drawer contains everything needed for preparing for the job. It holds gloves, tongue depressors (for mixing and dabbing on the glue), scissors, shrink wrap, small paper cups (for mixing the glue) and Play Doh, which Renchin sometimes uses as hoof packing.

Second Drawer: Glue Guns And Glue. This drawer holds the guns and tubes of Equilox adhesive that Renchin favors.

Third Drawer: Other Materials. Renchin uses the third drawer to hold tubes of Equi-Pak instant pad material and tips for applying it. It could also hold other hoof-building and repair materials.

Fourth Drawer: Application Materials. The bottom drawer holds materials used in the actual application of glue-on shoes. It holds a heat gun, Dremel tool, cleaning fluid, tape, wire brush and other tools.

Reds-Cart-Holds-Glue-3.jpg

PREP DRAWER. The top drawer in the cart holds materials used in preparing for the job, including mixing cups, tongue depressors, gloves, Play Doh, scissors and shrink wrap. Other drawers are dedicated to materials needed for other parts of the job.

Reds-Cart-Holds-Glue-2.jpg

GLUE CART. Apprentice Kelley House with Red Renchin’s glue cart. Each drawer holds the materials needed for one part of the job. The flat top provides a working surface and the flat bin protruding from the back of the cart holds waste materials.

Reds-Cart-Holds-Glue-1.jpg

GLUING ON. Red Renchin glues on a horseshoe as apprentice Kelley House stirs up more glue. Because he found he was using more and more glue-on shoes, Renchin came up with the idea of a cart to hold all the materials needed to glue on shoes.

Other Features

Renchin says the flat surface of the cart also provides a convenient working area, letting him set down a cup of glue or a glue gun for a moment as he works. He also had a bin fashioned for the back of the cart, where empty glue containers, broken or clogged tips and other waste can be stowed for later disposal.

 “It’s a good thing for trailers and bigger trucks,” Renchin says. He had one made for each of the identical trucks he uses in his multi-farrier business. But he also has a suggestion for farriers who work from smaller rigs that don’t have the room for a cart like his, or may not do the amount of gluing that he does.

“I used a long, aluminum tool box for when I was traveling by airplane,” he says. “It was one I picked up at a hardware store. You want to make sure that it has compartments, though. Compartmentalization is important so you can keep things where you can find them.”

GLUING ON. Red Renchin glues on a horseshoe as apprentice Kelley House stirs up more glue. Because he found he was using more and more glue-on shoes, Renchin came up with the idea of a cart to hold all the materials needed to glue on shoes