Hoofcare E-Mail Q&A

How does winter change the hoof care you do for clients and are there any products you make sure to have in your rig?

Q. How does winter change the hoof care you do for clients and are there any products you make sure to have in your rig?

 

Shoeing In The Deep Freeze

A. Winters in Wyoming are severe to say the least. I recommend to my customers that shoes be removed and feet trimmed to prevent the balling up of snow and ice. Horses that do remain shod for whatever reason need snow pads from the middle of October until late spring.

— Doug Anesi, Lander, Wyo.

A. Winter spans most of my shoeing season here in Alaska, so I always carry snowball pads (rim and bubble type), Borium, hoof packing, frost nails and, of course, propane and acetylene/oxygen to apply traction.

Besides horse products, I also have to make sure that my vehicles as well  myself are winterized. Snow tires and antifreeze must be checked. My winter gear has to be checked: Carhart’s winter gear, extra boots and socks and gloves. I shoe from out in the elements to indoor barns so I need to make sure that I can dress up and down at any time. Last but not least, I always make sure to allow extra time to get to appointments.

 — Heidi S. Larrabee, Palmer, Alaska

A. I shoe about 75 miles south of the Canadian border, so we see some pretty cold temperatures during the winter months. Many of my clients don’t have time to ride in winter with the shorter days and colder temperatures. so they…

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