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Referring Specialists Aids the Entire Hoof-Care Team

Consigning temporary work elevates the profession while saving time and money

Referring clients to a specialist is a common and valuable practice that’s proven extremely advantageous for patient outcomes. It is also proven valuable for professional development and advancement.

The human health care profession has elevated patient referrals to a high level1 that can be successfully incorporated into farrier practices. There is no need to reinvent the wheel, farriers can simply use it.

The blueprint for referrals2 is elementary and given the elevated risk of injury, many farriers likely have personal experience. When visiting a general practitioner or family doctor during a checkup, a health issue may arise that requires specialized care that is beyond the scope of their practice and expertise. The general practitioner secures the patient’s confidence by explaining the need and rationale for referring the patient to a specialist. The general partitioner gathers all the available information about the case and finds a specialist who will perform the necessary work.3,4

When transitioning the model from human patient to the hoof-care practice, the current farrier, the specialist and client meet to discuss the case’s details. The specialist’s entry and exit are defined, and the treatment protocol and execution are determined. It’s a blueprint that some farriers have found success with.

Farrier Takeaways

  • Referring specialist hoof-care work can help farriers who are in over their heads or want to save time and money.
  • A specialist should have strong integrity to avoid undercutting, criticizing and stealing the current farrier’s clientele.

Lending a Hand

Strasburg, Pa., farrier Patrick Meck…

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Cota

Jeff Cota

Jeff Cota has been a writer, photographer and editor with newspapers and magazines for 30 years. A native of Maine, he is the Lead Content Editor of American Farriers Journal.

Doug Anderson

Mount Airy, Md., farrier Doug Anderson specializes in corrective, therapeutic and remedial farriery. He was a member of the first U.S. cohort of farriers to receive the Grad Dip ELR (graduate diploma in equine locomotor research) from London’s Royal Veterinary College in cooperation with the University of Pennsylvania.

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