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Tools and Maintenance

forge liners
Post At
02/ 3/2006 - 11:26 P
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reply from
Ross Maynard
I have moved to SE AZ from the NW.My old bussiness consisted of paved roads coverd barns an rarely traveling mor than 20 to 30 miles. Now it is up to 70 miles and a lot of dirt ranch roads .My forge liners are not lasting .I have it anchored realy well but am only geting 2 to 3 months be for they are shaken apart. Are there any alternate types of liner material that i could use instaid of factory liners at a $160 a pop plus shipping . I have a valley forge.
Reply at
02/ 4/2006 - 3:57 P
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reply from
Kim Hillegas
Ross,

When you are talking about the forge liners are you talking about the fluffy stuff lining the walls? OR the fire brick?

I have an NC Whisper Momma and haven't had any problems with the fluffy liner coming loose on the rough roads, but my firebricks have cracked.

Last summer I got some barbecue grill firebricks and put then over the top of the cracked firebrick. So far so good.

WHen turning up the forge for a welding heat, it did melt the grill bricks- but then all that did was fuse to the fire brick.

I'll probably get a new firebrick this spring, but I'll still top it with a grill brick or two. The grill brick reduced the oven area of the forge which seemed to heat up the shoes faster too.

Hope this helps!

Kim
Reply at
02/ 4/2006 - 7:47 P
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reply from
Ross Maynard
The fire brick I can handle I put a peice of metal in the froge a clamp it down witha c clamp. Its the wall lining usauly cracks in the top where the holes are in the top and then falls in Had one last a whole week. They wont sell just the top peice. I was wondering if some car firewall isulation would work if I could find an outlet.I live 25 miles out of town and have 9miles of dirt road to travel twice a day befor I hit pavement..
Reply at
10/11/2006 - 9:01 P
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reply from
William Thomason
Check your forge placement. Try to keep it as far forward either above the axle or in front of the axle. This will give you the smoothest ride for your forge. Also try and make sure it is firmly locked into a travel position. This will prevent any unnecessary movement.
Reply at
01/ 6/2012 - 9:01 P
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reply from
William, 

    Good tip, about placing the forge forward of the axle! I should have thought that one up on my own. Hope ya have a good an prosperous new year!
Reply at
01/ 7/2012 - 9:41 P
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reply from
Pat Stevens
Try the I forge Iron website. They have a section in the forum dealing with gas forges. Lots of very knowledgable guys and they're very happy to help.
Reply at
01/ 8/2012 - 11:16 P
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reply from
heather obrien
Ross,

Try using KAO Wool ("the fluffy stuff"), instead of the board liner for the back, top and sides.  Buy a 2 foot square.  It comes about 2inches thick.  Peel it apart into two 1inch slabs.  (That will give you enough to line most forges twice.)

Take one slab and cut a piece the width of your forge and twice as long; do the dame for the back and sides.  Then fold each piece into and "accordion fold" and jamb them in tight.  The back and sides will hold up the ceiling.  Then wedge in your fire brick on the floor. You will be able to bounce down gravel roads all day; the KAO wool can't crack and because of the accordion fold it won't sagg.  Depending on how much you scrape the sides as you take your shoes in and out this should last you at least a year if not longer.  (Then you have the second 1inch slab left to line it again.)

Heather O,

Vancouver.
Reply at
01/ 9/2012 - 4:21 P
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reply from
Thanks for the tip, Heather!
Reply at
01/ 9/2012 - 11:19 P
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reply from
Chris Richardson
Kaowool is great stuff. I've used it in the past when building forges and it lasts a long time if you take care not to bump it with your metal when working.  I've also had good luck with the ceramic tiles used in kilns - they can be sourced from pottery suppliers and IMHO they reflect more heat than firebrick.  they do have a tendancy to crack easily if you throw metal in the forge...Some folks mount their forges on spring mounts to absorb the shock of rutted roads, although I've never had the need to do that.
Reply at
02/10/2013 - 12:53 P
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reply from
Brandin Schrader
I buy my refactory and reline myself. Easy and way cheaper. In my truck forge I run straightened metal clothes hangers trough the top to stiffin it up so it doesent sag on me. I also seen a guy put springs under the legs of his forge to dampen the jarring on it.



Brandin Schrader AF
  

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