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Horse Handling

Noavel Headstall
Post At
12/30/2005 - 10:15 P
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reply from
thomas lyles
The Rick Wheat Noavel Headstall is a great tool for farriers. I have taken an unruly, dangerous horse, and after just a few minute be able to safely continue and shoe the horse. My clients are amazed at the difference this tool makes in just one little session. It is alternative to drugs, or twitches. I am sold on this product. You should try one too.
Reply at
03/29/2006 - 7:49 P
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reply from
Rickey Benningfield
Well back in '64 when I started a Navajo showed me how to use a string tied to a Johnson halter, I call it a "Navajo Twitch" (It goes under the lower lip)

this does not hurt the animal and after a brief "Discussion" You don't even have to have anyone hold the horse-works for me! But then again I've only been working with horses for 41 years.
Reply at
03/29/2006 - 9:28 P
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reply from
Kim Hillegas
I don't even carry a twitch on my truck! I don't get under drugged horses either! The thought of getting under a thousand pound drunk being required to stand three legged does not appeal to me!

I've seen the Novell Headstall in use and watched its mfr (Rick Wheaten) break two of them and go to a third before the horse decided to start listening!

I use a "chain of command", my brains and I out-think the horse before resorting to strong arm tactics.

Often a strong word or a stomp of my foot is enough to get them to behave.

What I don't care for on the Novell is that it is so heavy and just the horse swinging his head to brush a fly will engage the headstall's weight and scold the horse for no reason.

Same as those dang knotted halters and heavy ropes! The knots are ALWAYS pressing on the nerve centers, so the horse never gets a break.

With my flat nylon halter, chain shank and flat braided cotton rope, I can get any horse to stand calmly for footwork within a very short time as well the horse gets releif and rewarded (no facial pressure) when he stands still.

The best tool in your box is your brain - not some gimmick.

Besides unlike having to have several different sizes of the Novell Headstall - my chain fits every horse very easily!

But like any tool - we don't all use the same kind. Glad this one works for you.

Regards,

Kim
Reply at
03/30/2006 - 4:46 P
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reply from
Rickey Benningfield
Kim, Please don't have a closed mind-this is not a twitch, but I call it a twitch because that used to be all people could relate to, when they see it work and how it really functions they are usually dumbfounded. This doesnot hurt the horse, all it does is give you an edge and in many cases that is all you need! Also do remember that I work with a lot of "UNSAVORY HORSES", once I get them to "THINKING" then they are usually done by other farriers, all I do is to train them so that anyone may work on them with the least amount of effort. From time to time some horses have to be tranqualized but this is because it is required by the attending VET because of medical reasons such as massive hoof loss or from the affects of founder or lamititus or even severe abscesses etc. I am a firm believer that you should learn how to use the tools at your disposal proficiently-Haven't seen the Novel Headstall in use or even a picture of it but may be interested-am always looking for a "BETTER WAY".
Reply at
10/ 7/2007 - 9:19 P
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reply from
brian hull
Kim I never carry twitches,ropes or any other

restraint to control unruly or dangerous horses, I

try to understand why the horse is unruly. I find

most times it' because some nervous or bad tempered farrier tried to intimidate the horse. I work one on one with bad horses, when i have the

trust of the horse i find theres no problem working

on the hooves. If the foal has a good experiance

with it's first trim there should be no problem in

the future. I find trust and understanding wins out

every time over twitchs chains ropes and drugs.

Brian Hull.

Reply at
10/ 8/2007 - 3:22 P
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reply from
chris diehl
I bought the noavel head stall and used it twice with death defying results. When I bought it I was at Rick Wheat clinic and it worked good. My first horse I deamed worthy of the noavel would explode and rear up going backwards. After putting this contraption on her head she flipped over backward almost landing on my truc. The second and final horse was an eighteen month filly who had never been trimmed I figures letas teach her this noavel thing from the get go. once the filly resonded to it and was listening good I started working. She reared up and struck at the noavel and got the owner right in the nose (busted it in three places) F*ck the noavel headstall.
Reply at
10/ 9/2007 - 7:17 P
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reply from
Jim Brown
I have used the Noavel Headstall a number of times with postive results each time. I believe that on a few of the horses I had that if it were not for the Noavel Headstall, I would not have gotten the horses trimmed/shod or at least in a timely manner. Everytime I've used it the owners have been amazed at the results it gets in such a short period of time. Of course, I only use it when other means are not working. Each horse responds differently to it and you must apply it accordingly which is why I have owners move away from the horse. I have had some rear up and one fall backwards but all calmed down and allowed me to work and usually stood better than some of the "good" horses. Personally, It is one of the best tools in my truck and like all tools, you must know how to properly use it before you can get the results you want. Stay Safe! Jim
Reply at
10/10/2007 - 6:28 P
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reply from
brian hull
Jim, you mentioned you had horses flip over backwards when useing the noavel headstall, who would have been liable for damage or injury to property, people or the horse. Something we have to think about. Brian Hull.
Reply at
10/10/2007 - 9:16 P
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reply from
Jim Brown
Brian,

Thanks for bringing this up. You're right about liability and it's something I think about everytime I go to work. Anytime I've used the Noavel, I've explained to the owners what it is, how it works, and how it may cause the horse to react same as with anything I do. It is only used with the owners permission and in a open/safe area. As far as the ONE horse that reared and fell over (and I've seen a few that have done the same with nothing but a halter and lead rope), that type of behavior is what lead to the Noavel being used in the first place (to correct the behavior, which it did) otherwise this horse would not have gotten trimmed due to the increasing possibility that the owner or myself may have been injured. Anyway, I'm not trying to sell anyone a Noavel, just stating my experiences with it. I understand there are those that like it and those that don't. All of us do not use the same type/brand of hammer or any other tool for that matter, we use what works best for us, the individual, and the Noavel just happens to provide me the best option at certain times. Thanks again for reminding us to never forget the safety and liability aspect of what we do. Take care! Jim
Reply at
10/10/2007 - 10:58 P
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reply from
Derek Grimwood
I used to think I failed if I didn't complete a job. Even on an unruly or untrained horse. Let the trainer train the horse to stand and then do your job. You may get by with a gimmick a hundred times but all it takes is one time. There are too many good horses out there to mess with one that is white eyed and needs training.
 

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