close window

Register today!

Register for the AFJ Web site and receive our free biweekly e-newsletter.

New 3M Web site

Make sure to check out all the great hoofcare info at 3M's new site!
Click here!

FREE SHIPPING!
Best-Selling Book

Therapeutic FarrieryTherapeutic Farriery
A Manual for Veterinarians & Farriers 292-page, hardcover book.
Learn More >>

Trimming and Shoeing

Dropped Soles
Post At
12/12/2007 - 4:38 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Jim Brown
Reply at
12/13/2007 - 9:36 P
Post a reply  
reply from
chris diehl
Jim it sounds like the client doesn't want to invest the money into X-rays so forget about an in depth fix If it were me I'd slap a shoe on backwards, charge "accordingly" and call it day :)
Reply at
12/14/2007 - 6:47 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Jim Brown
Reply at
12/17/2007 - 11:22 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Dr. Esco Buff, PhD, AFA-CF
Hello Jim,

I often see dropped soles when dealing with all the foundered horses I'm involved with. Two thoughts on this issue.

First, involves if the horses founder has stabilized and you believe the coffin bone will not continue to try and penetrate the through the sole. Usually the sole in these cases is harder, not too soft. With this type you can go ahead and shoe the horse in whatever manner as long as you make sure there is no obvious sole pressure or contact from the shoe. You may even have to put a hospital plate on to protect the sole. Over time I've seen many of these types re-model and eventually the dropped sole look will disappear.

The second, would be if you believe the horse has not stabilized and the horse is still foundering. Usually the sole in these cases is soft, mushy, and/or even painful when pushed on with just your thumbs. In this case, my treatment would be arresting this condition with a correctly placed rigid steel heart bar shoe.

In either case, I would err on the side of professional caution and advocate for radiographs so you can see what your dealing with, measure how much sole depth there may or may not be, determine any coffin bone degeneration or other issues, obtain the veterinarians diagnosis and opinion, etc...

Blessings and Merry Christmas,

Esco Buff, PhD, CF
Reply at
12/18/2007 - 5:24 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Jim Brown
Reply at
12/23/2010 - 3:53 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Rebecca J Scott
Reply at
12/28/2010 - 8:53 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Chris Richardson
Reply at
12/28/2010 - 9:29 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Esco Buff
Reply at
04/ 5/2011 - 9:40 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Israel Smith
Reply at
11/14/2011 - 9:59 P
Post a reply  
reply from
Erika Karrei
That's so good to hear Israel. I've never seen a foundered horse and hope to never see one. If I ever do, though, I'll know what the best course of action is. Call the vet for X-rays at least and a good farrier to work along side him!
  

Users must log in to the AmericanFarriers.com Web site in order to start new forum threads or reply to existing forum threads.

Login to post to the forum
© 2014. Lessiter Publications and American Farriers Journal. 225 Regency Court, Suite 200, Brookfield, WI, 53045. PHONE: (800) 645-8455, E-MAIL: info@lesspub.com.
Website Development by Envision IT